Scrambled Eggs with Chanterelle Mushrooms

Jajecznica z Kurkami

If you’re looking for an impressive Polish-style breakfast that’s easy to pull off, there’s no better answer than these creamy scrambled eggs, packed with fragrant chanterelles. That’s the real signature of summer.

We’re in the wonderful stage of summer when chanterelles are popping up in the forests and slowly greeting the produce stalls. There are so many ways to take advantage of these little mushrooms, but my favourite one is… breakfast. 

If you haven’t tried wild mushrooms and eggs together yet, perhaps this recipe will get your taste buds going.

For the full list of ingredients & detailed instructions, please see the recipe card at the end of this post. But before you scroll, there’s important stuff to know below.

Of course, everyone has their favourite way of making scrambled eggs, and there’s a variety of popular techniques you could follow.

A few years back, I tested the method from J. Kenji López-Alt’s amazing book “The Food Lab”, and since then – I never looked back. 

He recommends salting the eggs early, 15 minutes before cooking. That allows the salt crystals to dissolve fully in the egg mixture. And that’s great, because salt prevents the proteins in the egg from binding too tightly when they heat up. 

As a result, we get a more tender, moister scrambled egg. Check it out for yourself, it really works well. Scroll to the bottom for the recipe.

Do you need any special ingredients or equipment to make these Chanterelle Scrambled Eggs?

As long as you can get your hands on Chanterelles, you’re pretty much sorted. Everything else is available in any store.

Chanterelles are very unique in flavour, and it will be difficult (if not impossible) to substitute them with another mushroom. The closest matches are fresh Hedgehogs (in Polish: ‘Kolczak obłączasty’) or Yellowfoot (Polish: ‘Pieprznik trąbkowy’)

🇵🇱 In Poland, chanterelle season typically runs from June to October. In that time, they’re plentiful at farmer’s markets, supermarkets and even at discount stores. Out of season, you’ll find them in the ‘frozen section’ of the store.

Baskets filled with chanterelle mushrooms

They aren’t cheap though. It’s definitely worth picking some up personally, during a morning stroll in the forest. Luckily, chanterelles are very characteristic. Even the most inexperienced mushroom hunters should have no trouble recognizing them.

🌍 Wikipedia tells us that Chanterelles grow in Eurasia (Europe + Asia), North and Central America and in Africa. 

But from what I hear from the US-based members of the Polonist community, they’re very difficult to purchase. There are a few online retailers who will ship fresh chanterelles straight to your door (simply google ‘fresh chanterelles online’).

The good news is – you can hunt for them yourself! Here’s a great guide by Tyrant Farms on foraging chanterelles in the US.

What should you serve with these Scrambled Eggs with Chanterelles?

The most simple pairing would be a slice of fresh bread, topped with butter. 

For a more filling breakfast, serve some frankfurters or fried kiełbasa on the side. Sliced fresh tomatoes (generously sprinkled with chopped onion and fresh ground pepper) compliment the eggs nicely as well.

In terms of beverages, all of the classic breakfast choices are great: a cup of coffee or tea, fruit juice, a glass of milk – pick your favourite.

Can you make these Chanterelle Scrambled Eggs another way?

Sure, you can:

What diets are these Chanterelle Scrambled Eggs suitable for?

This recipe is gluten-free. It’s also suitable for those who follow low-carb and keto diets (just be mindful of any additional sides).

Can I refrigerate/freeze these Chanterelle Scrambled Eggs?

No, this dish tastes best straight off the skillet/frying pan. 

Smacznego!

Scrambled Eggs with Chanterelle Mushrooms
Scrambled Eggs with Chanterelle Mushrooms

Scrambled Eggs with Chanterelle Mushrooms

Yield: 2
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Additional Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 42 minutes

How do you go back to eating plain scrambled eggs after enjoying this summery version with fragrant, earthy chanterelles? Personally, I don’t think I can...  they're simply divine! Let’s make the most out of these tiny mushrooms, while they’re still in season.

Ingredients

  • 7-9 oz (200-250 g) chanterelles, fresh or frozen
  • 4 large eggs
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ small onion, yellow
  • 1 tablespoon butter, unsalted
  • 3 tablespoons fresh chives, chopped
  • black pepper, freshly ground

Instructions

  1. [Using frozen chanterelles] Leave the mushrooms in a bowl, on the kitchen counter overnight, to allow them to thaw naturally. Place thawed chanterelles onto a strainer and carefully pour boiling water over them. Dry immediately with a paper towel.
  2. Crack the eggs into a bowl, season them with salt. Using a whisk, whip them vigorously for half a minute, until they turn pale yellow. Set aside for 15 minutes.
  3. [Using fresh chanterelles] Clean patches of dirt with a paper towel, dry cloth, or with my preferred tool - a pastry brush. Wipe off any dirt and grime thoroughly. 
  4. Cut the larger mushrooms into smaller pieces. Leave the smaller ones whole.
  5. Peel the onion and chop half of it finely. Set aside.
  6. Melt a tablespoon of butter in a skillet/frying pan. Add the onions and let them fry on medium-low for a minute or two, allowing them to turn translucent.
  7. Add in the chanterelles and fry for 8-10 minutes, stirring frequently. The mushrooms will likely release some water, but it will evaporate in the process.
  8. Add in the eggs and let them cook undisturbed to begin with. As a thin layer of cooked egg forms on the edges, push it around and across the frying pan with a spatula. Continue for 2-3 minutes until nearly set. If the eggs still look slightly undone - that’s the time to take them off the heat and divide between plates.
  9. Sprinkle generously with chopped chives and freshly ground black pepper. Serve immediately.
Nutrition Information:
Yield: 2 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 205Total Fat: 15gSaturated Fat: 7gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 8gCholesterol: 387mgSodium: 408mgCarbohydrates: 3gFiber: 1gSugar: 1gProtein: 13g
Kasia Kronenberger

Kasia Kronenberger is the founder of Polonist, where she celebrates Poland’s very best food.
She’s a self-taught home cook, who – through her own culinary attempts – wants to show you how to recreate Polish flavours at home, wherever that is.
About KasiaAbout Polonist